Oral Presentation

Details

  1. Class: Unspecified
  2. This template is published for use.
  1. Step 1: Gather all relevant assignment information.
    Percent time spent on this step: 2%

    Instructions:

    You've made an excellent choice in using the Assignment Calculator to plan your time! Well done!

    To keep a copy of this schedule, click 'Print' in the top right hand corner and you can either print a copy or choose to print to PDF via the print menu. Mac and Linux users will find the option to print to PDF in the print menu on your machine. Windows users may need extra instructions, as only Windows 10 has a built-in PDF printer. Check this Digital Trends page for help with setting up a PDF printer on your Windows machine.

    The first step to a successful presentation is to make sure you have all the information you need about your assignment. Your Learning Guide should be your first port of call. You may also find additional information on your unit vUWS site and in class discussions. If you need to, contact your tutor to clarify what you need to do. 

    Find out if there will be internet access in the room where you will present, and if you will need to bring your own computer or device.

    If this is a group assignment, work out who is in your group and make sure you know how to contact them.

    Useful resources:


    Drop into a campus library and ask Library staff in red or chat with an Online Librarian or drop in to see a Study Smart Officer at your campus.
  2. Step 2: Understand your presentation task.
    Percent time spent on this step: 6%

    Instructions:

    University assignments usually ask you to demonstrate your knowledge and understanding of particular topic areas related to the unit you are studying. The assignment questions are often quite complex, so you will need to pay careful attention to what the assignment is asking you to do. If you don't respond to the task as asked, you won't get a good mark even if you present it really well.

    If you get stuck, you can also ask a Study Smart Officer at your campus library or access Study Smart Online.

    For groups: allocate roles or tasks and plan meeting times now.

    Useful resources:


    Drop into a campus library and ask Library staff in red or chat with an Online Librarian or drop in to see a Study Smart Officer at your campus.
  3. Step 3: Select and focus your topic. Conduct preliminary research.
    Percent time spent on this step: 10%

    Instructions:

    If you have to choose from a range of questions or topics, you might need to do some introductory reading (e.g. from your textbook) at this stage to help you decide which one to do.

    Once you have decided on your topic, do some background reading to familiarise yourself with it, and collect relevant information to analyse or evaluate - literature, data, artefacts, etc. Analyse and/or evaluate the information.

    For groups: Consider using Google Drive or another online platform to share your ideas as you research.

    Useful resources:


    Drop into a campus library and ask Library staff in red or chat with an Online Librarian or drop in to see a Study Smart Officer at your campus.
  4. Step 4: Develop your main argument and design a structure to present your argument.
    Percent time spent on this step: 10%

    Instructions:

    Try brainstorming all your ideas for the content, and anything else that is important to keep in mind. Remember, there’s no right or wrong in brainstorming, so write down everything you can think of.
    Now you have a basis from which to write an outline and organise your presentation. As you are brainstorming and writing, think about your audience. Who are they? What might they already know? Do you need to explain some basic concepts, or can you assume they know the context of your topic? The nature of the audience will inform how you write and position your content.
    You need to organise any presentation that you give in the way that best communicates your messages. You can structure your presentation a bit like you would an essay, with an introduction, a body, and a conclusion. The Study Smart resource on Structuring your presentation (PDF, 107 KB) has more information on how to do this.
    Consider these questions:
    • What is your main 'take home' point?
    • What will be your opening move?
    • What will be the body of your argument?
    • How will you conclude?

    Useful resources:


    Drop into a campus library and ask Library staff in red or chat with an Online Librarian or drop in to see a Study Smart Officer at your campus.
  5. Step 5: Design your visual aids.
    Percent time spent on this step: 20%

    Instructions:

    [Note: steps 5 & 6 can be done in reverse order, or even at the same time.]

    Decide on whether you will use visual aids, and if so, what kind of visual aids you will use. You might use a slideshow, whiteboard, artefacts/props, or handouts. Think about what would be most appropriate for the presentation task you have been assigned and the audience you will be addressing.

    If using a slideshow, design your slides with text and images, including slide transitions and animations if necessary. Consider integrity and copyright issues when you use images or videos. Ensure you acknowledge all your sources - for both text and images.

    For groups: consider using an online presentation platform such as MS Powerpoint OnlineGoogle Slides, or Prezi, so you can continue working on your slides collaboratively even when you’re not together in person.

    Useful resources:


    Drop into a campus library and ask Library staff in red or chat with an Online Librarian or drop in to see a Study Smart Officer at your campus.
  6. Step 6: Plan your talking points and timing.
    Percent time spent on this step: 15%

    Instructions:

    [Note: steps 5 & 6 can be done in reverse order, or even at the same time.]

    Make notes for what to say about each slide, and how long you will spend on each slide.

    As you start to write notes for your presentation, remember that speaking requires different language patterns to writing. If you write your presentation in the language of a formal essay and read it aloud without changing anything, you’ll sound overly formal and stiff. Not only that, but the audience will have trouble following what you’re saying, because you designed your words to be read. You’ll need to adjust the words you use and the length of your sentences so that you speak in a more natural manner and your audience can understand you.

    Also think about how to gain and maintain your audience's attention. You might use surprising facts or pictures for novelty, opposing viewpoints for a bit of conflict, exaggeration or puns for humour, or provocative questions to create suspense (University of Minnesota, 2011-2012). Make sure you use these in a relevant way and take care not to use offensive language or themes.

    Useful resources:

    References:

    University of Minnesota. (2010-2012). Assignment Calculator: Oral Speech/Presentation. Retrieved from https://www.lib.umn.edu/apps/ac/templates/11  

    Drop into a campus library and ask Library staff in red or chat with an Online Librarian or drop in to see a Study Smart Officer at your campus.
  7. Step 7: Practise for content, flow, and timing (without an audience).
    Percent time spent on this step: 10%

    Instructions:

    Practise without an audience to check that the organisation and timing of your content works well. It can be helpful to video yourself (e.g. using your phone) or practise in front of a mirror so you can see what the audience sees.

    Reflect on how it went:
    • What worked well?
    • What didn’t work so well?
    • At what points were there problems in the flow?
    • How did you feel?

    Make changes to your presentation based on your reflections. Think of questions the audience might ask and prepare some answers.

    For groups: If you take turns to speak, you could offer constructive feedback to each other. Make sure you think of ways to encourage each other as well as suggesting ways to improve.

    Each group member should come up with two questions the audience could ask (a hard one and an easy one!). Then select a few questions at random and brainstorm some answers as a group.

    Useful resources:

    • Study Smart Presentations page - resources for all aspects of your presentation
    • Reducing anxiety (PDF, 40 KB) - for strategies to help you appear cool, calm and collected on the day
    • Study Smart Tracking your success page and Track, progress, success (PDF, 67 KB, especially the individual reflection activity on page 2 and the group reflection activity on page 4) - to help you keep track of your learning goals and progress
    • Feedback hide and seek (PDF, 136 KB, pp.4-5) - for tips on making the most of the feedback you get so you can improve
    • Editing (PDF, 55 KB) and Proofreading (PDF, 40 KB) - don't let errors on your slides let you down

    Drop into a campus library and ask Library staff in red or chat with an Online Librarian or drop in to see a Study Smart Officer at your campus.
  8. Step 8: Practise with an audience.
    Percent time spent on this step: 10%

    Instructions:

    Practise your presentation with one or more onlookers. Invite them to ask questions so you can practise answering on the spot.

    Reflect on the feedback from your audience and how you felt giving your presentation in front of other people. Make changes to your presentation based on your reflections.

    Useful resources:

    • Study Smart Presentations page - resources for all aspects of your presentation
    • Reducing anxiety (PDF, 40 KB) - for strategies to help you appear cool, calm and collected on the day
    • Body language (PDF, 49 KB) - for tips on giving a good impression even before you open your mouth
    • Feedback hide and seek (PDF, 136 KB, pp.4-5) - for tips on making the most of the feedback you get so you can improve
    • Editing (PDF, 55 KB) and Proofreading (PDF, 40 KB) - don't let errors on your slides let you down

    Drop into a campus library and ask Library staff in red or chat with an Online Librarian or drop in to see a Study Smart Officer at your campus.
  9. Step 9: Get ready to present.
    Percent time spent on this step: 7%

    Instructions:

    Ensure you have all your materials ready to present. Gather your slideshow files, handouts, or props.

    If using a slideshow, load your presentation onto a portable data storage device, e.g. USB stick, or ensure it is stored in a 'cloud' storage platform that you can access from the room you will present in. It's good to have multiple copies of it in case one version becomes inaccessible for some reason.

    If you’re planning to present from your own computer or device, ensure you also bring any necessary adaptors so that you can connect your computer or device to the projector.

    Think about what you will wear and ensure it's appropriate for the context. Check the assignment instructions for this, e.g. are you meant to be presenting as if to a business or industry audience, or a potential client? If so, you'll need to dress the part.

    For groups: Ensure that each of you has the most recent version of the presentation. Make sure you know who is responsible for bringing a computer and adaptor, if necessary, or any other props.

    Useful resources:

    • Study Smart Presentations page - resources for all aspects of your presentation
    • ICT proficiency - for technology tips and links to websites or platforms where you can store or save your presentation

    Drop into a campus library and ask Library staff in red or chat with an Online Librarian or drop in to see a Study Smart Officer at your campus.
  10. Step 10: Final rehearsal and presentation.
    Percent time spent on this step: 10%

    Instructions:

    Rehearse once more on the day, then present to your class and teacher. Don’t forget afterwards to reflect on your audience’s feedback and reflect on your own experience, and make some brief notes so that you can improve for your next presentation! Reward yourself afterwards for a job well done.

    For groups: Debrief the presentation as a group (see page 4 in the ‘Track, progress, success’ PDF). Make sure you have a group celebration as well!

    Useful resources:

    • Study Smart Presentations page - resources for all aspects of your presentation
    • Study Smart Tracking your success page and Track, progress, success (PDF, 67 KB, especially the individual reflection activity on page 2 and the group reflection activity on page 4) - to help you keep track of your learning goals and progress
    • Feedback hide and seek (PDF, 136 KB, pp.4-5) - for tips on making the most of the feedback you get so you can improve

    Drop into a campus library and ask Library staff in red or chat with an Online Librarian or drop in to see a Study Smart Officer at your campus.